Press-Brothers-Cover

Press Brothers

The subject of this version of ‘Foreign Eye’ is a pair of brothers that were and still are so close to our Kolkata Parsee community, that it makes you wonder if they ever really ‘went away’. We bring to you the life and times (and wonderful anecdotes) of Khushrow and Hoshedar (Hoshi) Press, sons of our very own Arnavaz (Arna) and late Kersasp (Kersi) Press.

Born in Bombay, Khushrow and Hoshi moved to Kolkata with their parents at an early age and attended Bharucha Day school and St. Joseph’s. They soon developed a reputation for being interested more in sports, scouting, the Club and general loafing, than in their studies. After much goading from their loving parents, and having been almost forced to work hard, they both gained admission to the prestigious IIT, Bombay, a year apart. Much to their surprise, they graduated on time with engineering degrees. They both insist that whatever success they have had in their lives is due to the love and perseverance of their mom and dad.

Khushrow went on to obtain his PhD in the US, where he has lived since 1969. He is married to Nancy, a “patient, long suffering wife” (his words, not ours!) who has had to learn to cook for and live with “a Ghelo Bawaji from Cal”. They have two sons, Kersi and Joseph, each named after one grand parent. Both the boys have had their Navjotes done, a fact that quite pleases their dad. Today both are gainfully employed, one as an architect and one as a lawyer. Not having to pay for their upkeep any longer pleases their dad even more. Khushrow retired happily at the age of 58 from the last position he held as President of a large battery company, and spends his days “playing tennis, bridge and generally misbehaving in a manner he was well trained to do in Ole Cal”.

Hoshi was a stellar athlete, who played for CPC at a young age and at a time when there were so many players that it was actually hard to get on the club team. He played football for IIT for all five years and was chosen Captain the last two years. Hoshi also graduated with an MBA from IIM, Ahmedabad, and joined Godrej as a young management trainee. He retired from Godrej after 38 years of service, his last position being Vice Chairman. After a stint in Delhi (where Hoshi was a Trustee of the Delhi Parsi Anjuman from 1975 to 1989, possibly their youngest Trustee ever), he and his wife Khoorsheed have lived in Bombay with their children, Jehangir and Kareena. Both children graduated with MBAs and work in the hotel industry. Hoshi and Khoorsheed dote on their three grandchildren, Rehan, Malcolm and Karl. Hoshi spends his retired days looking after the grand children, playing badminton, going to the gym, consulting and sampling the fine cuisines available in Mumbai.

Now that we’ve got all the facts and figures out of the way, let’s take a trip down memory lane.

The Press brothers lived in the building just above Tiger Cinema, on Chowringhee Road, a stone’s throw from the Parsee Club, and here’s where the first story begins. “There was one simple rule we had to abide by –whencoming home at night, make sure you are never alone and cross the Maidan with the whole gang. Crossing with Jehanbux and all the Kapadia girls was OK as they were also considered a whole gang. There was general panic if we were not home by 8 PM.”

Life, as they knew it then, would come to an end if they had to miss going to CPC on any one weekend. It was unthinkable. Sundays were the best days,starting at 6:30 AM with a glorious sunrise and morning hockey or football. A bunch of them would then breakfast at the Press home. Onward to the SPCI hall for Scouting with Ardeshir Batlivala. Dhansak lunch at 1 PM with the only English program on radio, Musical Band Box. Swimming at La Martiniere followed, and finally back to CPC for an evening with the gang. On most of these evenings they had Jam Sessions at somebody’s home. If fortunate, there was some food as well, and not just a record player with 78 rpm, but also one that actually changed records by itself and played 6 records in a row, both 45s and LPs. There was Cliff Richard, Elvis and slow dancing!

Khushrow reminisces: “Life was simple and endless back then in the sixties. Kolkata was Cal. The air was clean, the traffic simple, studies were tough, the girls were pretty and the Parsee Club was heaven. Little did we realize that the forty teenagers in the ‘Gang’ would grow up and scatter all over the world. Today there is more of the old gang in the US than in Calcutta or Bombay.”

The Press brothers, like many of their friends, grew up and moved away as well, but ‘Cal’ is still the place where memories were made.

In talking with the Press brothers, you will find that one of their big disappointments in life is that their kids did not enjoy the benefits of the Parsee Club when growing up. And, despite their many professional achievements, one of their proudest moments was when ‘Akela’, Erach Medhora picked them to be in the first six ever to be invested by the 21/1 Calcutta Parsee Cub Pack.

They sign off with a message for all of us still in Kolkata: “The institutions that we have in Calcutta are fantastic—CPC, SPCI, PZA, Stree Mandal, CPADC etc. They provide a wealth of opportunities that most people do not have access to. Those of us that have done well in life owe a lot them. They should be nurtured and kept going!”


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The subject of this version of ‘Foreign Eye’ is a pair of brothers that were and still are so close to our Kolkata Parsee community, that it makes you wonder if they ever really ‘went away’. We bring to you the life and times (and wonderful anecdotes) of Khushrow and Hoshedar (Hoshi) Press, sons of our very own Arnavaz (Arna) and late Kersasp (Kersi) Press.

Born in Bombay, Khushrow and Hoshi moved to Kolkata with their parents at an early age and attended Bharucha Day school and St. Joseph’s. They soon developed a reputation for being interested more in sports, scouting, the Club and general loafing, than in their studies. After much goading from their loving parents, and having been almost forced to work hard, they both gained admission to the prestigious IIT, Bombay, a year apart. Much to their surprise, they graduated on time with engineering degrees. They both insist that whatever success they have had in their lives is due to the love and perseverance of their mom and dad.

Khushrow went on to obtain his PhD in the US, where he has lived since 1969. He is married to Nancy, a “patient, long suffering wife” (his words, not ours!) who has had to learn to cook for and live with “a Ghelo Bawaji from Cal”. They have two sons, Kersi and Joseph, each named after one grand parent. Both the boys have had their Navjotes done, a fact that quite pleases their dad. Today both are gainfully employed, one as an architect and one as a lawyer. Not having to pay for their upkeep any longer pleases their dad even more. Khushrow retired happily at the age of 58 from the last position he held as President of a large battery company, and spends his days “playing tennis, bridge and generally misbehaving in a manner he was well trained to do in Ole Cal”.

Hoshi was a stellar athlete, who played for CPC at a young age and at a time when there were so many players that it was actually hard to get on the club team. He played football for IIT for all five years and was chosen Captain the last two years. Hoshi also graduated with an MBA from IIM, Ahmedabad, and joined Godrej as a young management trainee. He retired from Godrej after 38 years of service, his last position being Vice Chairman. After a stint in Delhi (where Hoshi was a Trustee of the Delhi Parsi Anjuman from 1975 to 1989, possibly their youngest Trustee ever), he and his wife Khoorsheed have lived in Bombay with their children, Jehangir and Kareena. Both children graduated with MBAs and work in the hotel industry. Hoshi and Khoorsheed dote on their three grandchildren, Rehan, Malcolm and Karl. Hoshi spends his retired days looking after the grand children, playing badminton, going to the gym, consulting and sampling the fine cuisines available in Mumbai.

Now that we’ve got all the facts and figures out of the way, let’s take a trip down memory lane.

The Press brothers lived in the building just above Tiger Cinema, on Chowringhee Road, a stone’s throw from the Parsee Club, and here’s where the first story begins. “There was one simple rule we had to abide by –whencoming home at night, make sure you are never alone and cross the Maidan with the whole gang. Crossing with Jehanbux and all the Kapadia girls was OK as they were also considered a whole gang. There was general panic if we were not home by 8 PM.”

Life, as they knew it then, would come to an end if they had to miss going to CPC on any one weekend. It was unthinkable. Sundays were the best days,starting at 6:30 AM with a glorious sunrise and morning hockey or football. A bunch of them would then breakfast at the Press home. Onward to the SPCI hall for Scouting with Ardeshir Batlivala. Dhansak lunch at 1 PM with the only English program on radio, Musical Band Box. Swimming at La Martiniere followed, and finally back to CPC for an evening with the gang. On most of these evenings they had Jam Sessions at somebody’s home. If fortunate, there was some food as well, and not just a record player with 78 rpm, but also one that actually changed records by itself and played 6 records in a row, both 45s and LPs. There was Cliff Richard, Elvis and slow dancing!

Khushrow reminisces: “Life was simple and endless back then in the sixties. Kolkata was Cal. The air was clean, the traffic simple, studies were tough, the girls were pretty and the Parsee Club was heaven. Little did we realize that the forty teenagers in the ‘Gang’ would grow up and scatter all over the world. Today there is more of the old gang in the US than in Calcutta or Bombay.”

The Press brothers, like many of their friends, grew up and moved away as well, but ‘Cal’ is still the place where memories were made.

In talking with the Press brothers, you will find that one of their big disappointments in life is that their kids did not enjoy the benefits of the Parsee Club when growing up. And, despite their many professional achievements, one of their proudest moments was when ‘Akela’, Erach Medhora picked them to be in the first six ever to be invested by the 21/1 Calcutta Parsee Cub Pack.

They sign off with a message for all of us still in Kolkata: “The institutions that we have in Calcutta are fantastic—CPC, SPCI, PZA, Stree Mandal, CPADC etc. They provide a wealth of opportunities that most people do not have access to. Those of us that have done well in life owe a lot them. They should be nurtured and kept going!”


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